Canines have been used in law enforcement dating back to the late 1800’s. Their keen sense of smell, loyalty, and ability to guard; give them key traits for being able to serve and protect.

Hometown Heroes visited the Gloucester County Sheriff’s Office and spoke with Sergeant Brad Simmons, Sheriff Darrell W. Warren, Jr, and Master Deputy Phil Lutz regarding their K-9 program. We even got to meet Duke the bloodhound, and watched her trail the Sheriff’s Office intern!

The four main uses for police dogs are:

“1. Sentry and Apprehension: These dogs are used to provide security in sensitive or controlled areas, and for locating and apprehension of a suspect

2. Search and Rescue (SAR): These dogs are used to locate suspects and missing people and objects

3. Detection OR Explosives: Dogs are used to detect illegal substances OR to detect explosives. Note it is either one or the other.

4. Arson: These dogs are used to detect if the possible cause of a fire was arson.”

“About K-9’s.” National Police Dog Foundation, 2012-2019, http://nationalpolicedogfoundation.org/faqs/. Accessed 16 Apr. 2019.

Below are common breeds of police dogs:

*This list only represents some of the many breeds used in the police force

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GERMAN SHEPARD

*High intelligence, fearless and incredibly loyal. They’re made to be heard!

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BELGIAN MALINOIS

*This breed accompanied Navy SEAL Team Six in Operation Neptune Spear!

AND they’re used in the Secret Service!

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BLOODHOUND

*Great tracking dog! Remember Jack the Ripper and the Bobby’s?

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LABORADOR RETRIEVER

*Great sniffer! And great in crowded areas like airports

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ROTTWEILER

*Highly intelligent with a strong build

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DOBERMAN PINSCHER

*Very athletic! And able to restrain a criminal

And here’s two breeds you might not expect!

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BASSET HOUND

*Great on the bomb squad, sniff sniff

BEAGLE

*One of the best noses in the business!

FUN FACT:

Dogs are now being trained to detect hard drives and other electronic devices! Their smell can detect the chemical, triphenylphosphine oxide (TTPO), that’s shared in electronic storage devices to prevent them from overheating.